The Wandering Mind

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The Wandering Mind.

Object:  Compass

Observer:  Matthew A. Killingsworth, Daniel T. Gilbert

Try This:  Mindfulness for Beginners Meditation

Observation:  “People spend 46.9 percent of their waking hours thinking about something other than what they're doing, and this mind-wandering typically makes them unhappy. So says a study that used an iPhone web app to gather 250,000 data points on subjects' thoughts, feelings, and actions as they went about their lives.

The research, by psychologists Matthew A. Killingsworth and Daniel T. Gilbert of Harvard University, is described in the journal Science.

A human mind is a wandering mind, and a wandering mind is an unhappy mind," Killingsworth and Gilbert write.

Unlike other animals, humans spend a lot of time thinking about what isn't going on around them: contemplating events that happened in the past, might happen in the future, or may never happen at all. Indeed, mind-wandering appears to be the human brain's default mode of operation.

"Mind-wandering is an excellent predictor of people's happiness," Killingsworth says. "In fact, how often our minds leave the present and where they tend to go is a better predictor of our happiness than the activities in which we are engaged."

Time-lag analyses conducted by the researchers suggested that their subjects' mind-wandering was generally the cause, not the consequence, of their unhappiness.

Source: Wandering Mind Not a Happy Mind, Steve Bradt The Harvard Gazette